Contact – CD

April 20, 2020 8:34 am

When I first came to the University of North Texas in 1999 I immediately became friends with UNT Wind Symphony Director, Eugene Corporon.  I was fortunate to perform often with the Wind Symphony under Eugene’s baton and Contact is a compilation of our work together over the years.  I am extremely proud of this disc as I believe that it is the only complete album of percussion concertos with wind ensemble.   Many thanks to all of the amazing players on this recording including my co-soloists Keiko Abe, Sandi Rennick and Paul Rennick!

Contact! A CD of Percussion Concertos with Wind Ensemble

 

  1. Stubernic Fantasy (2012)………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Mark Ford (b. 1958)                                               Mark Ford, Paul Rennick, Sandi Rennick – Marimba Soloists

Chamber Symphony No. 1 for Marimba (1993)………………………………………………………………………. Daniel McCarthy (b. 1955)

  1. Deer Hunting in Michigan (2:52)
  2. Harmonic Rhythms (4:19)
  3. The Stuff of Adventure (8:20)

Mark Ford – Marimba Soloist

  1. Prism Rhapsody II (1996)………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Keiko Abe (b. 1937)

Mark Ford and Keiko Abe – Marimba Soloists

  1. Percussion Concerto (2009)………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Jennifer Higdon (b. 1962)

Mark Ford – Percussion Soloist

 

Bonus Digital Download

Ruffles Call from Afar (2013) by Yo Goto

Mark Ford, Snare Drum Soloist

Yo Goto (b. 1958) is recognized as a leading composer, specializing in music for winds, both in the United States and in Japan. His works have been performed at several international conventions including CBDNA, the World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles, and Midwest Clinic. Goto received a bachelor’s degree in music education from Yamagata University, a comprehensive teaching and research university in northeastern Japan, and studied composition with Shin-ichiro Ikebe at the Tokyo College of Music, completing a performance diploma. As an active composer, arranger, and clinician in Japan, Goto moved to Texas to study composition with Cindy McTee at the University of North Texas in 2001, earning graduate degrees in both composition and music education. Goto frequently writes and lectures on topics, such as selecting music for school band programs and the educational goals of band teaching; his information is recognized as an educational standard in Japan. His Songs for Wind Ensemble won the 2011 Sousa/Ostwald Award given by the American Bandmasters Association.

Ruffles Call from Afar (2013) is a concerto for drums and wind ensemble, and was commissioned by Associate Professor John Lane and the Sam Houston State University Wind Ensemble, Matthew McInturf conductor. Lane requested that Goto write for a relatively small setup or something that would be centered on the snare drum. For the solo percussion, Goto chose a field drum, which moves around with the soloist on the stage, and a two-snare drumset. This one-movement concerto was musically inspired by the Field Music of the U.S. Armed Forces, and the composer points out that the nature of the snare drum suggests military music using material derived from the melodies of Yankee Doodle and the Funeral March of the U.S. Army. Additionally, the drumming techniques used in this concerto are based on the rudiments of the National Association of Rudimental Drummers, and the composer notes that this piece is a tribute to the tradition of American drumming. On the other hand, traditional elements interact with conflicting dissonances and jazz idioms, while, as the composer notes, “the drum is sometimes heard from a distance as if ‘The Spirit of ‘76’ had been an old idea until today.” [American painter Archibald MacNeal Willard’s most famous painting, The Spirit of ’76, was exhibited at the Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia.] Goto evokes this painting while explaining that the title of his concerto was inspired by the ‘ruffles and flourishes’ fanfares played before pieces of honor for a distinguished person. Ruffles are played on drums, and flourishes are played on bugles, and the number of flourishes one receives reflects the status of the honored person; for instance, the President of the United States receives the highest number of ruffles and flourishes (four) before the band plays, “Hail to the Chief” (the honor music).  Dr. Sheryl K. Murphy-Manley, associate professor, Sam Houston State University.